In episode 87 of his video series, Dr. Larson discusses:

mTOR is a thing that has been studied by researchers for some time, but it is just now starting to trickle down into the medical community and be examined in relation to how it can help people with risk factors for illness and aging. mTOR is a nutrient sensor in the body, and when it is inhibited, it causes a fascinating cascade of events that help to preserve health and decrease, the aging process and decrease disease factors. Over the years, researchers have worked hard to figure out what influences mTOR.

Two other key things help to inhibit mTOR: calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet is a diet that is high in fat and low in carbohydrates. Those two key things help to set up the cascade of risk factors that can lead to neurodegenerative conditions. DR. CHAD LARSON

A study published in the Journal of Aging Neuroscience funded by the Institutes of Health looked at important aspects of aging and disease. They evaluated things like glucose metabolism, body weight management, cerebral vascular blood flow, and amyloid beta in the brain, which is implicated in Alzheimer’s and dementia. Science already knows that the greater the amount of amyloid beta, the bigger the risk a person has for aging brain and cognitive issues.

Three key things inhibit mTOR. One is a pharmaceutical drug called rapamycin. In natural medicine, we aren’t really interested in pharmaceutical agents. This current study found that two other key things help to inhibit mTOR: calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet is a diet that is high in fat and low in carbohydrates. Those two key things help to set up the cascade of risk factors that can lead to neurodegenerative conditions.

In the study, when mTOR was inhibited, subjects had a significant decrease in risk factors. Researchers observed a better glucose metabolism in those who ate the ketogenic diet versus those who ate regular food. They also found that a ketogenic diet along with caloric restriction, leads to a decreased risk for diabetes, and it helps with body weight management. Body weight management also decreases your risk factor for many diseases and illness. Those who ate a ketogenic, caloric restricted diet, also significantly increased blood flow to the brain, which leads to better health and wellness for brain function.

There was also a decrease in amyloid beta in the group that ate a ketogenic, calorie restrictive diet, which can help prevent Alzheimer’s. And there were overall improvements in brain function, due to the detoxification of the bran and a reduction in inflammation. Those who ate the ketogenic, caloric restricted diet also had an improvement of the blood-brain barrier. The brain has a barrier system like the gut, and when the barrier breaks, it can lead to inflammation in the brain. The researchers were able to demonstrate that mTOR is a key mechanism that is inhibited by caloric restrictive and ketogenic diets.

The study was done on mice, but we know that mTOR inhibitors are already approved by the FDA. The study involved mice because they did experiments on the brain of the subjects, which you can’t do with human subjects. This study went in-depth into how inhibition can help with aging and risk factors for disease. And will likely lead to a host of recommendations related to how a caloric restrictive, ketogenic diet, can help improve overall health and wellbeing.

Recommended Product

KETO Assist™

 

Other Posts you may like

What do you think?

Comment Below to share your opinion & experience with diets and aging — And if you like what Dr. Larson has to say, we’d love it if you could give us a share on social media!